August to December at Wayfaring Woman

In the last third of 2016 I took a bit of a break from writing and significantly reduced¬†my work here at Wandering Woman Wondering and at Wayfaring Woman (my column on the Agora at Patheos). I’ve included links below to the articles that I did not previously link here. Some of them are updates and revisions to work that I previously presented here on Wandering Woman Wondering, and some are new.

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Magical Masking and Dionysos

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/agora/2016/08/wayfaring-woman-magical-masking-and-dionysos/

The Roman God Mercurius – An Introduction and Ritual

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/agora/2016/08/wayfaring-woman-the-roman-god-mercurius-an-introduction-and-ritual/

Gifts From the Heart – An Autumn Spiced Guided Meditation

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/agora/2016/09/wayfaring-woman-gifts-from-the-heart-an-autumn-spiced-guided-meditation/

Guarding and Protecting Your Magical Workings

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/agora/2016/10/wayfaring-woman-guarding-and-protecting-your-magical-workings/

Hekate’s Hounds – Warders Between Worlds

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/agora/2016/10/wayfaring-woman-hekates-hounds-warders-between-worlds/

I hope you find these to be useful stepping stones along your own path, or at least intriguing in some way ūüėÄ

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Masking: A Dionysian Mystery

Masks¬†are symbols¬†for the surrender of as well as the transformation of identity. By way of masking, we have the power and the freedom to take on a new persona and experiment with new ways of being and feeling. These are the gifts of Dionysos, whose idols were often simply a mask¬†set atop a post or pillar draped with vegetation. At the mystical level, the gift of masking goes deeper than¬†tinkering with identity; it is the call to lose one’s self entirely within Dionysos, to be filled with the god himself (a.k.a,¬†enthousiasmos, meaning¬†possession by a god). The mask – an extension of Dionysos’ power – obscures the identity of the wearer and allows the wearer to fall into the Dionysian current, to be as a maenad in a ecstatic revelry or as¬†a player in ancient¬†Greek theatre creating¬†a character by shedding his own.

In early August, I gathered with two fellow witches in the pitch of night around a blazing campfire in the woods of southern Illinois to honor¬†Dionysos, he who is God of Ecstasy, Lord of the Vine, and Leader in the Dance of the Fire-Pulsing Stars. We invoked the god, burned fragrant incense, and poured libations of local port wine in the god’s many names. I pulled my mask over my face and allowed myself to slip into Dionysos’ power. As I beat a slow steady rhythm on my modest frame drum I settled into the liminal space betwixt and between the self and other, between the internal and external. In the space between I could feel Dionysos’ might begin to fill me. I lifted my voice in his honor and I new for a moment a sliver of what the maenads feel enveloped in him. I played on and we witches¬†danced around the fire shouting Dionysos’ many praise names into the night.

That night I reveled in the life that filled me and the life all around me. I felt connected to the stone beneath my feet, to the trees all around, and to the animals roaming at the edge of the fire light. This is a part of Dionysos’ gift as I experience it. He brings an unrelenting awareness of life and connection with the vital forces of being. Identity shifts, ecstasy¬†consumes, and Dionysos emerges.

Masking is only one of Dionysos’ mysteries but it has blessed me a great deal in the time that I have been experimenting with it. It is a way to slip out of one’s own skin, to loosen ego/personality, to shift and shape¬†self, and to experiment with various ways of being. It is powerful magic and as such it is not without its risks. There are many ways to mask; it is not limited to placing rubber or plastic on one’s face and stomping around in the woods. Masking can be done by way of the clothes we wear, the voice we put on, the make-up we wear, the smile we strategically assume, and a slew of other physical and behavioral props. Depending on how you mask, when, and why there are different potential challenges and risks involved.

Masking requires that one¬†know one’s self (at least well enough) before willing to lose one’s self, whether it’s undertaken for fun or to serve Dionysos. Masking in his honor is truly awesome and quite beautiful, but remember that Dionysos is not all fun and games. Disrespect for or misuse of his mysteries can manifest¬†a host of psychic ailments.¬†At best, careless masking can leave one adrift inside with little to no sense of core being and disconnected from Source. Among other things, such a state could make a person overly reliant on other’s perception of them and/or more likely to accept and wear¬†the masks (or psychological projections) that others place upon the person. At its worst careless masking can result in character erosion (like telling lies and eventually believing them), madness, and soul loss. Basically to avoid the negatives, be mindful and aware of both yourself and the nature of the mystery as you enter its practice, *especially* if it is something that you plan to do on a regular basis.

Masking is an amazing Dionysian magic and mystery, and one with tremendous potential to stimulate self-exploration, ecstatic release, and mystical union. I very much look forward to continuing this work.