Calling Up Courage

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In the wee hours of a day in late March, I caught a glimpse of a horse, a spear, and a beautiful bronze shield. In an instant, I was in a woman’s presence standing in a temple that was partially open to rich, green fields. The woman’s red robes caught my eye. She smiled warm and strong, her glistening spear held firm in her right hand. I knew she was Macha. I stared in awe, whispered “Your Majesty”, and took a knee. She appreciated the show of respect and reverence. Smiling broadly she took my hand and tugged upward for me to stand. Once I was on my feet again, she kissed my right cheek and gave me welcome in Gaelic. Her words were unclear at first because I don’t speak her language. She observed my confusion and switched to English.

Her words poured over me along with images of spears and horses, warriors at the ready, and Macha herself on horseback. She was battle-ready, laughing and riding free. She told me to be courageous, to stand bravely no matter the enemy at the gate or the fear deep in my heart. She demanded that I fully and boldly express myself in the world and in every way that matters to me because so-called “Others” living unapologetically is a vital aspect of Resistance as we work for change in the world.

I tearfully accepted her guidance and then she was gone.

Audre Lorde Quote

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One thought on “Calling Up Courage

  1. Swift chariots
    and horses that carried off the prize,
    once I had plenty of them:
    a blessing on the King who granted them.

    My body seeks to make its way
    to the house of judgement;
    when the Son of God thinks it time,
    let him come to claim his loan.

    My arms when they are seen
    are bony and thin;
    dear was the craft they practised,
    they would be around glorious kings…

    I envy nothing that is old
    except the Plain of Femhen;
    though I have donned the thatch of age,
    Femhen’s crown is still yellow.

    The Stone of the Kings in Femhen,
    Rónán’s Fort in Breghon,
    it is long since storms first reached them
    but their cheeks are not old and withered….

    I have had my day with kings,
    drinking mead and wine;
    today I drink whey and water
    among shrivelled old hags….

    The flood-wave,
    and the swift ebb;
    what the flood brings you
    the ebb carries from your hand. …

    Happy is the island of the great sea,
    for the flood comes to it after the ebb;
    as for me, I do not expect
    flood after ebb to come to me.

    — The ‘Nun’ of Bérre

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